Mayor announces telephone line to help residents with survey on LMPD Chief hiring

June 24, 2020

Mayor Greg Fischer today announced the launch of a telephone option to help residents fill out a survey about their priorities for Louisville’s next permanent chief of police.

Starting Thursday, June 25, 2020, residents can call (502) 528-3543 from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and noon-6 p.m. on Sunday, and they will be assisted by call-takers who will input their answers to questions on a community survey, which has been available online since early this month.

The survey asks:

What are the three most important qualities or skills you would like to see in the next police chief;
What are suggestions for improving police services; and
What a new chief must accomplish immediately, and over the next 2-3 years.

Both the phone line and the online survey will be operational through Friday, July 3. Already, more than 8,000 people have completed the online version of the survey, which can be accessed at https://arcg.is/18fTnS.

“I’m encouraging everyone in our community, especially those who are speaking out about police policies, to participate in the process to hire a new permanent chief by calling or completing the online survey,” Mayor Fischer said, adding that Louisville Metro Police Department (LMPD) officers are also being surveyed. “The new Chief must be able to communicate and have trust with both our police officers and the larger community they serve, and that starts with hearing what residents want and expect from our police department.”

The Mayor relieved former LMPD Chief Steve Conrad of his duties on June 1, and named Robert Schroeder as LMPD’s acting chief, pending the hiring of a permanent chief.

Mayor Fischer announced on June 3 that the city had hired the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF), a non-profit Washington, D.C.-based police research organization to lead the search, noting that PERF has identified best practices for cities across the country on fundamental issues such as reducing police use of force; developing community policing and problem-oriented policing; using technology to deliver police services to the community; and evaluating crime reduction strategies.

In addition to the survey, PERF will hold listening sessions over the next month, with various focus groups being held across the community. After that, PERF will review and analyze all the information residents provide to help pinpoint the qualities and characteristics needed for the city’s next police chief. They will use that information to conduct a national search and create a list of qualified candidates. 

Next steps include convening a small group of community and Louisville Metro representatives to review the list, narrow it, conduct interviews, and send the Mayor their final recommendations. The entire process is expected to take four to six months.

In announcing the survey earlier this month, the Mayor stressed that Metro Council will be involved in the process, encouraging people to take the survey, participating in listening sessions, and helping identify other participants in the process.