Louisville Metro Releases First Open Data Report

October 30, 2014

          


Louisville Metro Releases First Open Data Report

71 new data sets added over the last year

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (October 30, 2014) – Louisville Metro Government has put71 new datasets online in the past year, bringing the total to 107, a 197% increase, according to the city’s first annual Open Data Report released today.

The report — presented to Mayor Greg Fischer by Jason Ballard, the city’s director of Metro Technology Services — is part of an executive order signed in 2013 to summarize the current state of data availability in Metro Government and present plans for continued improvement of public access to information.

Some of the new datasets include: 

  • Historical areas and markers
  • Animal Services intakes and outcomes
  • Residential and commercial recycling tonnage
  • Abandoned urban property
  • Foreclosures initiated

“We are committed to increasing the openness, effectiveness and transparency of city government,” said Fischer. “This report will allow citizens to see the progress. Our Open Data Portal presents city data in a format that’s easy for people to access and use, and automates the process for presenting the data online, saving city staff time and taxpayer money.”

According to Ballard, opportunities for the upcoming year include:

  • Employee focusing on Performance and Improvement Outreach advancing online services
  • New Steering Committee to identify community’s data interests and needs
  • Development of an open data strategy for 2015
  • Additional digital means for data such as text-based, mobile apps, etc.

 

According to the US City Open Data Census, Louisville ranks 11th out of 70 cities participating in open data.

Open Data Portal (http://data.louisvilleky.gov) offers the following:

  • Raw data sets for city expenditures, employee salaries, park locations and amenities and links to other sites with useful data and maps;
  • Fast data delivery;
  • Where applicable, the most accurate data with automatic uploading -- eliminating manual processes;
  • Published data sources via API that can be exposed with metadata and filtering views giving IT developers more flexibility in how they can use the data;
  • Cost savings as the site was built in-house without the cost of using an outside vendor which helps city government save on data maintenance and publishing;
  • A design that functions well with iPads, tablets and smart phones.

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