Pending Individual Landmark Designation Requests

20-LANDMARK-0001 - Odd Fellows Building (aka Liberty Hall)

On October 19, 2019, Metro Council directed PDS staff to carry out a review of the Odd Fellows Building (Liberty Hall) for designation consideration. Liberty Hall (Kentucky Historic Resources #JC-LC-147) is located at 211-215 W. Muhammad Ali Boulevard in the central business district of Louisville. The building is a four-story masonry structure constructed in 1898.

The Liberty Hall Association whose members were primarily from different Odd Fellows Lodges had the building constructed in 1898. The building was meant to serve as a meeting place multiple fraternal organizations as well as providing commercial store front space on the first floor. This type of building, known as a “Public Hall” was utilized by fraternal, religious, benevolent, ethnic, and patriotic groups which were widely associated with Progressive Era. Groups like the Independent Order of Odd Fellows played a vital role in the social structure of Louisville in the early 20th century.

A Pre-Hearing Conference was conducted on January 30, 2020 and the Landmarks Technical Review Committee met on March 10, 2020 to review the draft designation report. The Technical Review Committee voted to move the review of the draft designation report to the full Landmarks Commission.

Draft Designation Report

A hearing by the Historic Landmarks & Preservation Districts Commission has not been scheduled at this time.


20-LANDMARK-0002 - Plymouth Congregational Church

Initiated by a request from members of the Plymouth Congregational Church, the property owners, to conduct a review of the complex for designation consideration. The Plymouth Complex is comprised of the Plymouth Congregational Church (1630 W. Chestnut Street) and the Plymouth Settlement House (1626 W. Chestnut Street) located at the southeast corner of S. 17th and W. Chestnut Streets. The Complex was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980 as contributing buildings to the Russell Historic District.

The Plymouth Complex was constructed in the Russell Neighborhood by African Americans for African Americans. The Russell Neighborhood was established in the mid to late 19th century for mostly white residents. Russell was a fashionable neighborhood for many families. However, as residential areas south and east of Louisville grew in size and popularity, many white families began moving out of the neighborhood as early as the 1890s. African American professionals first purchased the larger homes on the major east-west streets, but the other streets were more gradual in their population shift. One indication of the rapid influx of African American families in the Russell Neighborhood was the establishment of the Plymouth Settlement House. Rev. E.G. Harris was smart to select 17th and Chestnut Streets for the location of the Plymouth Congregational Church. He saw that the area was changing in population, but he also saw those populations that he felt were being left behind—lower income African Americans. In 1917, the church opened the Plymouth Settlement House as living quarters for working African American women, as a place for wholesome entertainment and education for children and adults, and as a social work facility that could help those lower income families. As the settlement house grew in its importance to the neighborhood so did the Plymouth Congregational Church. The church tore down its small frame building and built a larger masonry structure in 1929. Throughout the years both played a significant role in the Russell Neighborhood, city of Louisville, and the Commonwealth by promoting the advancement of African Americans and putting programs and initiatives in place to see this occur.

Draft Designation Report

A hearing by the Historic Landmarks & Preservation Districts Commission has not been scheduled at this time.