HIV Prevention

    HIV prevention

     

    The Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness offers prevention case management services and workshops about reducing the risk of HIV transmission. The department includes special emphasis programs for injection drug users, sex trade workers, African Americans, Hispanics and LatinX, and LGBTQ+ persons. Our staff also conducts online and field outreach, distributing free condoms and other safer sex supplies to Louisville residents.

    Key points
    • HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is a virus that attacks the body’s immune system.
    • If HIV is not treated with medication called antiretroviral therapies (ART), HIV can progress to AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). Currently, there is no effective cure for HIV.
    • Once people get infested with HIV, they carry the virus for life.
    • With proper medical care, HIV can be well controlled and never progress to AIDS.
    • HIV medicines stop the virus from making copies. This is called Viral Suppression. When a person with HIV is virally suppressed, they cannot pass the infection to others. This status is called HIV Undetectable.
    • HIV Undetectable = HIV Untransmittable (U=U) HIV Status Neutral – A concept where HIV-positive people can’t infect anyone and HIV-negative people can’t get infected.
    HIV Prevention
    • With proper medical care, HIV can be well controlled and never progress to AIDS.
    • HIV medicines stop the virus from making copies. HIV medicines stop the virus from making copies. This is called Viral Suppression.
    • When a person with HIV is virally suppressed, they cannot pass the infection to others. This status is called HIV Undetectable.
    • HIV treatment is 100% free funded through the federal Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program.
    • HIV case managers are an available resource to help one navigate the HIV care continuum (medical appointments, housing assistance, mental health services, establishing insurance, prescription treatment, etc.
    HIV Myths - HIV is NOT spread by:
    • Insect bites: mosquitoes, ticks, or other insects.
    • Saliva, tears, or sweat.
    • General interaction with people living with HIV, including hugging, shaking hands, sharing toilets, sharing dishes, or a closed-mouthed kiss with someone who is living with HIV.
    • Sexual activities that don’t involve the exchange of body fluids: foreplay, touching, mutual masturbation.
    • Transmission through the air. Exposing a used syringe to air does not kill HIV.
    • HIV is not a gay disease. Everyone has an HIV status.
    • HIV is not AIDS – AIDS is the most severe stage of HIV infection.
    • HIV treatment is NOT too expensive for anyone
      • HIV treatment is FREE and federally funded through the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program.
      • All persons living with HIV qualify for treatment support services.
    How soon after exposure can I be tested for antibodies?
    • HIV: 23 to 90 days after an exposure
    • Hep C: 8-11 weeks
    HIV prevention basic info

    HIV is only transmitted 4 ways:

    • blood
    • semen (including pre-ejaculate)
    • vaginal secretions
    • breast milk
    4 easy ways to prevent HIV

    1. No sharing of needles or safer injection supplies. (For more information, visit LIVE HIV Free.)
    2. Condoms and lubricant during penetrative sexual intercourse. Click here to see a list of locations where free condoms are provided.
    3. PrEP - a once daily pill that is 99% effective in preventing HIV if exposed during sexual intercourse
    4. Treatment as prevention; Undetectable = Untransmittable.

    PrEP Info

    - KY PrEP Specifics https://www.pleaseprepme.org/kentucky
    - PrEP Copay Assistance

    HIV Testing Locations
    For HIV Treatment 

    Norton Healthcare Infectious Disease Institute
    4950 Norton Healthcare Blvd
    Suite 303
    Louisville, KY 40241

    (502) 629-6498


    University of Louisville Ryan White Program and 550 Clinic
    UofL Hospital Ambulatory Care Building
    550 South Jackson St.
     2
    nd Floor
    502-561-8844


      Hep C prevention

      How is Hep C transmitted?

      Hep C is transmitted primarily through exposures to blood or bodily fluids that contain blood.

      Most common exposures include:
      • Injection-drug use (currently the most common mode of HCV transmission)
      • Birth from an HCV-infected mother
      • Sex with an HCV-infected person
      • Sharing personal items contaminated with infectious blood (i.e., razors or toothbrushes)
      Less common exposures include:
      • Unregulated tattooing
      • Needlestick injuries in health-care settings
      Easy ways to prevent Hep C:
      • No sharing of needles or safer injection supplies
      • Practice safe sex
      • Avoid direct exposure to blood or blood products
      • Sharing personal items
      • Choose tattoo and piercing parlors carefully

      If you are concerned about other STD’s (sexually transmitted diseases), you can be evaluated at our Specialty Clinic. The Specialty Clinic diagnoses, treats and educates patients with gonorrhea, syphilis, chlamydia and other STDs.

          For more information, see the CDC

           

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